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Getting a Bike Rack

cycling support banner

 

EcoSchools recognizes that schools wanting to make active, safe and sustainable transportation a larger part of their culture need help. The EcoSchools Cycling Support Program was developed to assist schools in addressing their cycling needs by providing them with an opportunity to apply for infrastructural and/or programming supports. 

Bike Racks

The TDSB’s Bike Rack program aims to help schools promote and support cycling through the installation of bike racks. The purchase and installation of bike racks acquired through this application will come at no cost to schools. By encouraging TDSB staff and students to ride their bikes, we can promote a healthier environment, increase the health of individuals and prevent traffic congestion. If your school has a proven commitment to active transportation and is in need of bike backs, we encourage you to apply!

What is the timeframe for the project?

Ongoing: Accepting applications
June 30th: Deadline to submit application to be considered for spring installation of the following school year
Fall of the following school year:

Successful applicants are notified

An EcoSchools staff member will conduct site visits at the selected schools to determine bike rack placement

Spring of the following school year:

Bike racks will be installed at selected schools

 

How to apply for bike racks?

All schools are eligible to apply. Schools that are selected to receive bike racks must be able to demonstrate a high level of commitment (at least one EcoTeam action and one teaching and learning related activity) to be considered. We ask for this level of commitment to ensure the bike racks are well used and that their installation helps raise awareness around active transportation. The following criteria will be used to rank applications:

  Rating Values Description
Rating Criteria Weight 1 2 3 4 5
EcoSchools Certified 0.75 Not Certified       Certified/Have applied
LOI Ranking

Elementary = (LOI Rank/474)

Secondary = (LOI Rank/110) 
0.25 81% - 100% 61% - 80% 41% - 60% 21% - 40% 0% - 20%
% of Bike Space to Population 0.50 >10%       <10%
Commitment in the Past 0.75 Assessed based on the number of initiatives, duration, and
level of engagement. See rubric for more details.
Commitment: EcoAction 0.25 Assessed based on the number of initiatives, duration, and
level of engagement. See rubric for more details.
Commitment: Teaching 0.25 Assessed based on the level of engagement. See rubric for details.

After you have read all of the information please complete the google application form and submit it by June 30th.

SUCCESSFUL APPLICANTS WILL BE CONTACTED IN THE FALL OF THE FOLLOWING SCHOOL YEAR. If your school was not successful and you would like feedback on your application please contact Jenn.Vetter@tdsb.on.ca.

NOTE: Preference will be given to schools who are not receiving EcoSchools water bottle refill stations or large trees in the same application year.
 

For ideas of what this might look like at your school, review the Active Safe and Sustainable Transportation Initiative Ideas resource, or see the examples below.

›  Create targeted communications
Targeted signage

Targeted signage can help to promote campaigns and communicate to the community the benefits of travelling in an active and sustainable way. Use signage to promote active transportation as both a healthy and sustainable alternative to single passenger vehicle trip. Including interesting facts with your signage can help to draw in your audience. Did you know if children walked for all trips of less than one kilometre, they would take an average of 2,238 additional steps per day?

Dedicated display

Select a highly-trafficked area of the school, such as in the main foyer, or near the gym/cafeteria, and create an active transportation themed display. Content can be fact-based, including statistics and tips related to the benefits of choosing an active mode of transportation for our health and the environment. Alternatively, you could use your display to promote a campaign or visually represent active transportation monitoring (see below for more details).

Announcements and Newsletters

Remind staff and students to use an active mode of transportation during morning announcements. Send the message home by including relevant content
›  Monitor modes of transportation at your school
Tracking the modes of transportation that staff and students use to travel to and from school over a period of time can help to influence the focus of future campaigns. For example, if you notice the vast majority of students are driven to school, despite living within walking distance, challenge students to walk to school once a week through a Walking Wednesdays campaign (see Active Transportation Themed Days below for more details). Use your collected data to set a benchmark and see if there is a modal shift over time.
›  Active Transportation Themed Days
Integrating active transportation into your school’s regular routine is a great way to build a culture of awareness. The following suggestions can be done on a weekly or monthly basis:

Anything But Car (ABC) Day

As the name suggests, on Anything But Car (ABC) Day, staff and students are asked to rethink their travel to school and use a mode of transportation other than a vehicle. As an incentive, some schools have experienced success by having a TTC transfer raffle. To thank students for their participation, consider posting thank-you notes on bikes that are locked to the bike racks at your school.

Walking/Wheeling Wednesdays

Invite staff and students to walk/wheel to school on a designated day each week/month. To encourage participation, consider holding a competition between classes. At the end of each week/month, recognize the class with the highest number of participants by presenting them with an award such as the “golden shoe award”. You can also turn this initiative into a fun learning opportunity by counting and celebrating the number of kilometres your school has walked, combined. To put the numbers into perspective, record the distances on a map of Canada.
›  Host a Bike Rodeo
Bike rodeos provide students with an opportunity to learn and practice cycling skills in a controlled environment. During the rodeo, students rotate between stations to learn a variety of cycling skills including proper helmet sizing, road safety, and bike maintenance. Consider Inviting members of the community, including parents, police officers, and your public health nurse to join in the day’s events. For more ideas, check out Ontario Active School Travel's Tips for Planning a Successful Bike Rodeo.
›  Start a Bike Club
bike club banner Gather a group of like-minded students and teachers and start a bike club! As a team, plan group rides, go on bike-themed field trips and/or learn bike maintenance skills and road safety. Organizations with a focus on cycling, such as Cycle Toronto or CultureLink may be helpful resources as you establish your club. Contact Jenn Vetter if you are interested in connecting with bike clubs in at other schools in the TDSB.
›  Clean Air Campaign
Launch a campaign that is dedicated to improving the air quality around your school. If idling is an issue at you school during drop-off and pick-up times, consider creating some student-made anti-idling signs to remind parents to turn off their engines while waiting. Feeling really committed?

Go one step further and establish an idle-free zone at your school. See Ontario Active School Travel for more details.
›  Include a Teaching and Learning Component

Active transportation offers numerous learning opportunities, and can complement a variety of curriculum areas. Consider incorporating a focus on active transportation into classroom teaching or, for a larger impact, a school-wide learning initiative. Some topics you may want to explore include:

 

Health & Physical Education STEM Social Studies, History and Geography
Active Living Strand
  • Physical fitness benefits of using active modes of transportation
  • Mental and emotional health benefits of using active modes of transportation
Healthy Living Strand
  • Road safety
Examples of real world problems:
  • What are the environmental impacts of active modes of transportation/non-active modes of transportation?

    E.g., how is our air quality impacted by different modes of transportation?
  • How could the modes of transportation that students use to travel to and from school be tracked/assessed/measured?
  • How could changes to infrastructure increase/decrease active transportation in our community?

    E.g., presence or lack of bike lanes, crosswalks, sidewalks etc.
  • How do structures used in active transportation (e.g., bicycles, rollerblades, skateboards) create friction?
Social Studies, History and Geography

People and Environments
  • Cultural patterns and trends of active transportation locally/global
  • Assessing the transportation options and barriers in your school community
  • Plan and design infrastructural changes that promote green transportation within the city
  • Investigating the impacts of various modes of transportation on land use
  • Citizenship responsibilities to advocate for equality/access in relation to active transportation
›  School Travel Plan
Creating a school travel plan with short, medium and long term plans, can help to encourage students to travel to and from school in a
safe and active way. Conduct a neighbourhood walkabout to identify the barriers and travel needs of your school and then create an action plan.

For a step-by-step guide to creating a school travel plan, see the Ontario Active School Travel's website.



 
›  Events
Car Free Day – September 22nd  

International Walk to School Day – October 3rd

Winter Walk Day – First Wednesday in February

Bike to School Week – Week starting on the last Monday of May
›  Organizations

Cycle Toronto

CultureLink Settlement and Community Services - Bike to School Project

Evergreen Bike Works DIY bicycle repair and workshop

Health & Physical Education STEM Social Studies, History and Geography
Active Living Strand
  • Physical fitness benefits of using active modes of transportation
  • Mental and emotional health benefits of using active modes of transportation
Healthy Living Strand
  • Road safety
Examples of real world problems:
  • What are the environmental impacts of active modes of transportation/non-active modes of transportation?

    E.g., how is our air quality impacted by different modes of transportation?
  • How could the modes of transportation that students use to travel to and from school be tracked/assessed/measured?
  • How could changes to infrastructure increase/decrease active transportation in our community?

    E.g., presence or lack of bike lanes, crosswalks, sidewalks etc.
  • How do structures used in active transportation (e.g., bicycles, rollerblades, skateboards) create friction?
Social Studies, History and Geography

People and Environments
  • Cultural patterns and trends of active transportation locally/global
  • Assessing the transportation options and barriers in your school community
  • Plan and design infrastructural changes that promote green transportation within the city
  • Investigating the impacts of various modes of transportation on land use
  • Citizenship responsibilities to advocate for equality/access in relation to active transportation
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