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The electronic translation service on the Toronto District School Board website is hosted by Google Translate, a third party service. The TDSB does not guarantee or warrant the reliability, accuracy or completeness of any translated information.

The quality of the translation will vary in some of the languages offered by Google. Google Translate is a free service and currently offers translation in over 100 languages, but does not capture all languages or dialects.

The basic translation goal is to capture the general intention of the original English material. Before you act on translated information, we encourage you to confirm any facts that are important to you or may affect any decisions you make.

The Toronto District School Board is committed to equity and community engagement, and by providing this tool, we are making our information more accessible to families whose first language is not English.

Google Translate Frequently Asked Questions

Will Special Education programs continue?

Yes, the TDSB will continue offering Special Education programs.

The Enhancing Equity Task Force recommended the review of Special Education Learning programs with an emphasis on:

  • Placement and inclusion of students with special education learning needs;
  • Retaining congregated sites while exploring options to include students with special education needs at a home school;
  • Professional development for staff;
  • Providing a process and clear information for collaborative decision-making about student needs, and between parents and staff;
  • Identifying physical and attitudinal barriers;
  • Ensuring that all families, including those new to Canada and those whose first language is not English, can successfully navigate the Special Education system.

The report did not recommend phasing out or closing Special Education sites or Special Education programs, special education congregated school sites or programs, which includes Gifted and Learning Disabilities (LD).

In response to these recommendations, TDSB Director of Education John Malloy has recommended:

  • To confront and challenge deficit thinking that organizes students by perceived ability;
  • To continue offering Intensive Support Program (ISP) placement options;
  • To continue looking at more inclusive models in the delivery of the Grade 4 to 8 Home School Program (HSP);
  • Review the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and Identification, Placement and Review Committee (IPRC) processes to ensure greater clarity, transparency and accountability, so that parents, guardians, and students feel valued and included. The Director does not recommend phasing out Gifted programs or congregated school sites.

Will the TDSB continue offering placements in congregated special education school sites?

Yes, the TDSB will continue offering placements in congregated special education school sites. 

Will Gifted programs continue?

Yes, gifted special education classes (sometimes called congregated classes) will continue in TDSB schools. Students who meet the criteria for giftedness may be offered a regular class or special education class placement through the Identification, Placement, and Review Committee (IPRC) process. Parents will be able to choose between a regular class or special education class placement.

Are there changes to the criteria for an offer of placement to a gifted special education class?

No, there are no changes to the criteria. Students who meet the criteria for giftedness may be offered a regular class or special education class placement through the Identification, Placement, and Review Committee (IPRC) process. Parents will be able to choose between a regular class or special education class placement. Students who are eligible for a special education class placement with intensive program support for giftedness will meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • May demonstrate an unusually advanced degree of general intellectual ability.
  • May demonstrate a significant need for enrichment programming, requiring differentiated learning experiences of a depth and breadth beyond those normally provided in the regular school program to satisfy the student’s level of educational potential.
  • May demonstrate evidence of significant challenges in interpersonal, social, emotional, and/or, self-regulation development in the school setting.
  • May have a Gifted Rating Scale – School Age Record Form (GRS-S) T score of 60 or higher in one of the 6 scales.

Are any psychological assessments on hold?

There are no postponements of any assessment process.  Assessments are continuing as normal.

Will there be a change in how Gifted programs are delivered?

No, there will be no change in how Gifted programs are delivered. Special education class placement for giftedness at the TDSB starts in Grade 4. This program offers differentiated learning experiences appropriate for the student’s age and grade, but at a greater depth and breadth than in the regular class. In Grade 9 and 10, students who accept placement in gifted special education classes, are required to take four special education courses (English, Math, Science and Geography-Grade 9/History-Grade 10). In Grade 11 and 12, students who accept placement in gifted special education classes take two special education courses (English and Math).

How do I transfer my child from a Gifted program in another school board into a TDSB gifted special education class?

When registering your child at a TDSB school, please share information about your child’s special education needs. Depending on the nature of those needs and the documentation shared, parents may be offered a Special Education Program Recommendation Committee (SEPRC) meeting. A SEPRC meeting will take place once the student is registered but before they attend a TDSB school.

Can I request a gifted special education class for my child who has been identified as gifted and is currently placed in a regular class?

Yes, you can ask for an Identification Placement and Review Committee meeting to talk about your child’s progress and needs.

If the criteria for giftedness changes, will my child still be able to access the Gifted program?

Yes, regardless of when your child has been identified as gifted, the identification will be honoured.

What happens at an Identification, Placement and Review Committee (IPRC) meeting?

In the IPRC meeting, parents/guardians, the student’s teacher, school administrator and, if appropriate, the student, will be at the meeting. The IPRC will review all information and make a decision regarding exceptionality and placement.  As with all IPRCs, if the student is exceptional, the committee will first consider how the needs of the student can be met in a regular class. The parent/guardian will be asked their preference regarding placement. Parents will continue to be able to choose between a regular class or special education class.

How are students who are identified as gifted supported in the regular classroom?

Students who are identified as gifted in the regular classroom would have an Individual Education Plan (IEP) that would outline their unique learning needs as well as accommodations, modifications or alternative programming needed to best support them.

My child took the Canadian Cognitive Abilities Test in the fall. What should I expect?

In the 2016-2017 school year, the TDSB introduced a universal screening process for all Grade 3 students. The test has three objectives:

  • To provide information to the classroom teacher about the strengths and learning needs of each student to better support teachers’ programming.
  • To help teachers know when to bring a student forward to In-School Team (IST) or School Support Team (SST) for programming suggestions.
  • To improve equity of access for all students to differentiated programming including the potential identification of students with a gifted exceptionality. Students, who meet the criteria for a possible exceptionality, including giftedness, will be considered by the In-School Support Team for the next step in the process.

As of December 21, 2017, all schools have received individual student results and they will be sent out to parents between now and February 18, 2018. Schools have already reviewed the summary results and are following the IST process.

Read Qs&As about the Canadian Cognitive Abilities Test and the Universal Screening Process.

Can parents of students identified as gifted, who didn’t accept placement in a gifted ISP, request placement in a gifted ISP in the future?

Yes, if your child has the exceptionality of giftedness, a parent may ask for an Identification, Placement and Review Committee (IPRC) meeting to talk about the child’s progress and needs.   The parent/guardian will be asked their preference regarding placement. Parents will continue to be able to choose between a regular class or special education class.  

 

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To enable all students to reach high levels of achievement and to acquire
the knowledge, skills, and values
they need to become responsible members of a democratic society.
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